[ UrbanRail.Net ]     [ Europe ] [ Americas ] [ Asia ] [ Africa ] [ Oceania ]     [ News ] [ Books ] [ Links ]

TOKYO
 Japan

Tokyo Subway Map

Click on map to expand to full size!Tokyo Streetcar

Tokyo Metro Lines | TOEI Lines | Other Rapid Transit in Tokyo | Monorails around Tokyo | Links

Report error!
 System and History

The Tokyo Subway has 13 lines and is operated by two different companies: Tokyo Metro Corporation (formerly TEITO; also called TRTA or Eidan Subway - Teito Rapid Transit Authority) and TOEI (Transportation Bureau of Tokyo Metropolitan Government).

The first lines were built using international standard gauge (1435 mm) but later 1067 mm gauge was chosen, which is more common in Japan and thus allows reciprocal operation between subways and suburban railway lines, i.e. subway trains continue on suburban lines at certain hours or suburban lines use certain sections of the subway lines. Several JR and private suburban rail lines radiate from different stations in Tokyo.

  TOKYO METRO Lines - Eidan Subway
6/2008 - 9 lines with a total length 195.4 km
 GINZA Line (G)
Ginza Line14.3 km, 18 stations, Asakusa - Shibuya (Line 3); 1435 mm gauge; no reciprocal service.

The first subway line in Tokyo, opened in 1927 as a private railway between Asakusa and Ueno (2.2 km), extended to Shibuya by 1939.

30 Dec 1927: Asakusa - Ueno (2.2 km)
01 Jan 1930: - Suehirocho (1.1 km)
21 Nov 1931: - Kanda (1.1 km)
29 Apr 1932: Mitsukoshimae (0.7 km)
24 Dec 1932: - Kyobashi (1.3 km)
03 March 1934: - Ginza (0.7 km)
21 June 1934: - Shimbashi (0.9 km)
18 Nov 1938: Toranomon - Omotesando (4.2 km; without Tameikesanno)
20 Dec 1938: - Shibuya (1.3 km)
15 Jan 1939 (no through service): Toranomon - Shimbashi (0.8 km)
16 Sept 1939: through service at Shimbashi
30 Sept 1997: - Tameikesanno added

 

 MARUNOUCHI Line (M)
Marunouchi Line © Kei Hanai Marunouchi Line27.4 km, 27 stations, Ikebukuro - Ogikubo / Honancho (Line 4); 1435 mm gauge; no reciprocal service, four short surface sections.

20 Jan 1954: Ikebukuro - Ochanomizu (6.4 km)
20 March 1956: - Awajicho (0.8 km)
20 July 1956: - Tokyo (1.5 km)
15 Dec 1957: - Ginza (1.1 km)
15 Oct 1958: - Kasumigaseki (1.0 km)
15 March 1959: - Shinjuku (5.8 km)
08 Feb 1961: - Nakanosakaue (1.9 km; without Nishi-Shinjuku) and then two branches - Shin-Nakano (0.9 km) and Nakanofujimicho (1.9 km)
01 Nov 1961: - Minami-Asagaya (3.1 km; without Higashi-Koenji)
23 Jan 1962: - Ogikubo (1.5 km)
23 March 1962: - Honancho (1.3 km)
18 Sept 1964: - Higashi-Koenji station added
28 May 1996: - Nishi-Shinjuku station added

 

 HIBIYA Line (H)

Hibiya LineHibiya Line © Kei Hanai 20.3 km, 21 stations, Kita-Senju - Naka-Meguro (Line 2); 1067 mm gauge; reciprocal service on northern suburban line (Tobu-Isezaki Line), while reciprocal service south on Tokyu Toyoko Line was discontinued on 15 March 2013.

28 March 1961: Minami-Senju - Nakaokachimachi (3.7 km)
31 May 1962: - Ningyocho (2.5 km) and - Kita-Senju (2.1 km)
28 Feb 1963: - Higashi-Ginza (3.0 km)
25 March 1964: - Ebisu (without Ginza and Hibiya) (8.0 km)
22 June 1964: - Naka-Meguro (2.0 km)
29 Aug 1964: - Ginza and Hibiya added

 

 TOZAI Line (T)
Tozai Line train © Charles SarjeantTozai Line © Kei Hanai 30.8 km, 22 stations, Nishi-Funabashi - Nakano (Line 5); 1067 mm gauge; at the western end, reciprocal service with JR Chuo Main Line; at the eastern end with JR Sobu Line and the Toyo Rapid Railway. The Tozai Line (which means East-West Line) runs on the surface east of Minami-sunamachi (13.8 km).

23 Dec 1964: Takadanobaba - Waseda (1.7 km)
16 May 1966: - Nakano (3.9 km) and - Takebashi (4.1 km)
01 Oct 1966: - Otemachi (1.0 km)
14 Sept 1967: - Toyocho (5.1 km)
29 March 1969: - Nishi-Funabashi (without Nishi-Kasai, Minami-Gyotoku, Myoden) (15.0 km)
01 Oct 1979: - Nishi-Kasai added
27 March 1981: - Minami-Gyotoku added
22 Jan 2000: - Myoden added

 

 CHIYODA Line (C)
Kita Senju © David Fossett24.0 km, 20 stations, Yoyogiuehara - Kita-Ayase (Line 9); 1067 mm gauge; at the western end, reciprocal service with Odakyu Odawara Line; at the eastern end with JR Joban Line.

20 Dec 1969: Otemachi - Kita-Senju (9.9 km)
20 March 1971: - Kasumigaseki (2.2 km)
20 Apr 1971: - Ayase (2.6 km)
20 Oct 1972: - Yoyogikoen (6.2 km)
31 Mar 1978: - Yoyogiuehara (1.0 km)
20 Dec 1979: - Kita-Ayase (2.1 km)

 

 YURAKUCHO Line (Y)
Yurakucho Line train © Charles Sarjeant 28.3 km, 24 stations, Wakoshi - Shin-Kiba (Line 8); 1067 mm gauge; from Wakoshi reciprocal service on Tobu Tojo Line; reciprocal service is also available from Kotake-mukaihara along the Seibu Ikebukuro Line.

Opened 1974 - 1988; in Dec. 1994, the Kotakemukaihara - Ikebukuro section was quadrupled, with the Yurakucho New Line introduced to relieve the Yurakucho Line. This line was extended south to Shibuya in 2008 and became the Fukutoshin Line.

30 Oct 1974 : Ginzaitchome - Ikebukuro (10.2 km)
27 March 1980: - Shintomicho (0.7 km)
24 June 1983: - Chikatetsu Narimasu (earlier called Eidan Narimasu) (9.3 km)
25 Aug 1987 : - Wakoshi (2.2 km)
08 June 1988: - Shin-Kiba (5.9 km)

 HANZOMON Line (Z)

Hanzomon Line16.9 km, 14 stations, Shibuya - Oshiage (Line 11); 1067 mm gauge; reciprocal operation with the Tokyu Den-en-toshi Line from Shibuya and with the Tobu Isesaki Line from Oshiage. The Hanzomon Line runs parallel to Ginza line between Shibuya and Aoyama-I-chome, but on separate tracks.

01 Aug 1978: Shibuya - Aoyama-itchome (2.7 km)
21 Sept 1979: - Nagatacho (1.4 km)
09 Dec 1982: - Hanzomon (1.0 km)
26 Jan 1989: - Mitsukoshi-mae (4.3 km)
28 Nov 1990: - Suitengu-mae (1.3 km)
19 March 2003: - Oshiage (6.1 km)

 

 NAMBOKU Line (N)

Namboku Line © Kei Hanai 21.3 km, 19 stations, Meguro - Akabane-iwabuchi (Line 7); 1067 mm gauge.

The Namboku Line shares tracks with the Mita Line between Shirokane-takanawa and Meguro, from where both lines provide reciprocal service with the Tokyu Meguro Line.
From the northern terminus at Akabane-iwabuchi most trains continue along the mostly underground Saitama Railway, which was opened on 28 March 2001.

29 Nov 1991 Akabane-Iwabuchi - Komagone (6.3 km)
26 March 1996 Komagome - Yotsuya (7.1 km)
30 Sept 1997 Yotsuya - Tameikesanno (2.2 km)
26 Sept 2000 Tameikesanno - Meguro (5.7 km; of which 2.3 km and three stations are used jointly with TOEI Mita Line)

 FUKUTOSHIN Line (F)
Fukutoshin LineFukutoshin Line12.1 km, 11 stations (+ 5 stations share with Yurakucho Line), (Wakoshi -) Kotake-mukaihara - Shibuya (Line 7); 1067 mm gauge.

In Dec. 1994, a 3.2 km double-track section of the Yurakucho New Line (Kotake-mukaihara - Ikebukuro) (New Yurakucho New Line Ikebukuro Station) was opened to relieve the Yurakucho Line. Initially referred to as Line 13, it was eventually extended south to Shibuya on 14 June 2008 as the Fukutoshin Line (fukutoshin means subcenter > the line links the three subcenters of Ikebukuro, Shinjuku and Shibuya). At the northern end, trains continue to Wakoshi on the Yurakucho Line, and beyond that point on the Tobu Tojo Line); reciprocal service is also available from Kotake-mukaihara on the Seibu Ikebukuro Line. Reciprocal service from Shibuya south on Tokyu Toyoko Line to Yokohama began on 16 March 2013.

Fukutoshin Line Panel07 Dec 1994: Kotakemukaihara - Ikebukuro (as Yurakucho New Line) (3.2 km)
14 June 2008: Ikebukuro - Shibuya


<<< Top of Page

  TOEI Lines
12/2000 - 4 lines with a total length of 107 km + 2.3 km Mita Line extension to Meguro (shared with Namboku Line)
 ASAKUSA Line (A)

Asakusa Line18.4 km, 20 stations, Oshiage - Nishi-Magome (Line 1); 1435 mm gauge; reciprocal operation on Keisei Oshiage Line, Keisei Main Line and Shibayama Railway Line from the northern terminus; and on Keikyu Main Line and Keikyu Kuko Line from Sengakuji.

04 Dec 1960: Oshiage - Asakusabashi (3.1 km)
31 May 1962: - Higashi-Nihombashi (0.7 km)
30 Sept 1962: - Ningyocho  (0.7 km)
28 Feb 1963: - Higashi-Ginza (1.6 km)
21 Dec 1963: - Shimbashi (0.9 km)
01 Oct 1964: - Daimon  (1.0 km)
21 March 1968: - Sengakuji (2.6 km)
15 Nov 1968: - Nishi-Magome (6.9 km)

 

 MITA Line (I)
Mita LineMita Line26.5 km, 24 stations, Meguro - Mita - Nishi-Takashimadaira; 1067 mm gauge; elevated north of Shimura-sakaue station.

The section between Shirokane-Takanawa and Meguro is shared with the Namboku Line, 2.3 km, opened 26/9/2000. Reciprocal service from Meguro with the Tokyu Meguro Line.

27 Dec 1968: Takashimadaira - Sugamo (10.4 km)
30 June 1972 - Hibiya (7.3 km)
27 Nov 1973: - Mita (3.3 km)
06 May 1976: - Nishi-Takashimadaira (1.5 km)

26 Sept 2000: - Meguro (jointly with Namboku Line) (4 km incl. 1.7 km of separate Mita - Shirokane-Takanawa tracks)

 

 SHINJUKU Line (S)

Shinjuku LineShinjuku Line23.5km, 21 stations, Motoyawata - Shinjuku (Line 10); 1372 mm gauge; through trains from Shinjuku on Keio Line.

21 Dec 1978: Iwamotocho - Higashi-Ojima (4.9 km)
16 March 1980: - Shinjuku (7.3 km)
23 Dec 1983: - Funabori (3.6 km)
14 Sept 1986: - Shinozaki (4.9 km)
19 March 1989: - Moto-Yawata (2.8 km)

 

 OEDO Line (E)

Oedo Line40.7 km, 36 stations, Hikarigaoka - Tochomae (Line 12); 1435 mm gauge; no reciprocal service.

Opened in 5 stages between 1991 and 2002, the Oedo Line is like a ring line with a handle, but trains cannot run in a circle, but reverse at Tocho-mae. O-Edo-sen means Big Edo Line and Edo was the city's name until 1868.

10 Dec 1991 Hikarigoaka - Nerima (3.8 km)
19 Dec 1997 - Nerima- Shinjuku (9.1 km)
20 Apr 2000 - Shinjuku - Kokuritsu Kyogijo (National Stadium), (2.4 km)
12 Dec. 2000 - final section (25.4 km) of the entire ring line opened.
2 Nov 2002 - Shiodome station opened


 

System | TRTA Lines | TOEI Lines | Other Rapid Transit in Tokyo | Monorails around Tokyo | Links

<<< Top of Page

 Other Metro-like Systems in Greater Tokyo

Yamanote Ring Line

34.5 km circular line, mostly elevated, with 29 stations, part of the JR network. Connects with most private railways and several subway lines, with trains every 2.5 min during peak hours. First section opened in 1885 from Shinagawa to Akabane, later extended and electrified in 1909, ring completed in 1925.

Yamanote Line Yamanote Line Yamanote Line Yamanote Line

Saitama LineSaitama Railway

Opened on 28 March 2001, this line is actually a northern extension of the Namboku subway line, running mostly underground outside Tokyo in the Saitama Prefecture. It is 14.6 km long and has 8 stations:
Akabane-Iwabuchi - Kawaguchi Motogo - Minami Hatogaya - Hatogaya - Araijuku - Totsuka Angyo - Higashi Kawaguchi - Urawa Misono.

Official Website


Nippori-Toneri Liner

Opened on 30 March 2008, this is an automatic guided transit system (9.7 km, 13 stations), operated by TOEI and serving the northeastern sector of the Tokyo metropolitan area. It intersects with the Chiyoda Line at Nishi-Nippori.
Stations: Nippori - Nishi-Nippori - Akado-Shogakkomae - Kumanomae - Adachi-Odai - Ogi-Ohashi - Koya - Kohoku - Nishiaraidaishi-Nishi - Yazaike - Toneri-Koen - Toneri - Minumadai-Shinsuikoen

Official Website

Toneri-koen © John Tanini Toneri-koen © John Tanini

 

 Public rail transit in Tokyo Waterfront Odaiba development

Odaiba (otherwise named Daiba) is an artificial island in Tokyo Bay. Built on the place of 19th century line of fortified islands (Daiba in Japanese means "cannon batteries placed on the islands"), this island was supposed to be a futuristic self-consistent town for 100,000 inhabitants. In addition to two motorways joining the mainland Tokyo with the island, it is served by two rail transit systems (see map)

 

YURIKAMOME Waterfront Line

This is a fully automated driverless line which provides service to new waterfront developments on the reclaimed islands in Tokyo Bay. It has been opened on 1 Nov 1995 from Shimbashi (transfer to Ginza and Asakusa lines), goes along the coast for 3.1 km and then crosses the bay over the 570 m long Rainbow Bridge. The total length of the first section was 12 km, there were 11 stations. On the islands the line had two transfer points with Rinkai Line at Odaiba-kaihinkoen and Ariake. On 2 Nov 2002 a station Shiodome, a transfer to the newly opened station on the Oedo line was opened. A 2.7-km, 4-station extension from the existing terminus Ariake to Toyosu station on the Yurakucho line opened on March 27, 2006.

Fares are between 180 and 370 Yen depending on the distance travelled.

14.8 km, 16 stations (Official Site)(Wikipedia)

Some station photos can be seen here. And here are some great pictures and a text in French.

Yurikamome Line Yurikamome Line Yurikamome Line Yurikamome Line

TOKYO WATERFRONT AREA RAPID TRANSIT (Rinkai Line)

This 15.1 km long metro line starts at Shin-kiba where it connects to the Yurakucho line and JR East. It runs mostly underground across Tokyo's harbour area. The initial 7.8 km was extended on 31 March 2001 from Tokyo Teleport to Tenzohzu Isle, where transfer is possible to the Tokyo Monorail. On 1 Dec. 2002 it, the western section to Osaki with interchange to the JR Yamanote Ring Line was brought into service. Station names are from east to west: Shin-kiba, Shinonome, Kokusai-Tenjijo, Tokyo-Teleport, Tennozu Isle, Shinagawa Seaside, Oimachi and Osaki.

Fares are between 180 and 280 Yen depending on the distance travelled.

Link: Tokyo Waterfront Area Rapid Transit


 

TOKYO MONORAIL

Tokyo MonorailThis line opened on 17 Sept 1964 for the opening of Olympic Games, and connects the Haneda Airport to Hamamatsucho Rail Station. When it opened, it had only two stations - Hamamatsucho and Haneda-koku. A year later, an intermediate station at Oi-keibajo-mae (Oi Race Track) was opened (27 May 1965). After that, several more intermediate stations have been added - Seibijo (20 March 1967), Ryutsu Center (15 Dec 1969), Showajima (7 Feb 1985) and Tennozu Isle (19 June 1992). On 27 Sept 1993 the line was extended from Seibijo to Haneda-kuko-daiichi-biru (Haneda Airport Terminal 1) with two intermediate stations, while the former Haneda-kuko station was closed. On 1 Dec 2004, a 0.9 km extension of the line opened to serve Haneda-kuko-daini-biru (Haneda Airport Terminal 2). After a new station, Haneda Airport International Terminal opened on 21 Oct 2010 between Tenkubashi and Shin-Seibijo stations, the 17.8 km line has 11 stations. During day time trains go at 4-minute intervals, with only every third train calling at all stations. The rest of trains are skip stations between Ryutsu Center and Haneda-kuko-daiichi-biru or run express serving only the airport terminals.

Fares are between 190 and 470 Yen depending on the distance travelled.

www.tokyo-monorail.co.jp

Here are some great pictures with a text in French.

<<< Top of Page

Tokyo Monorail Tokyo Monorail Tokyo Monorail
 
 Monorail systems in the Greater Tokyo metropolitan area

Monorails in Tokyo AreaCHIBA Monorail

Visit our Chiba Monorail page!

TAMA Monorail

Visit our Tama Monorail page!

SHONAN Monorail

Visit our Shonan Monorail page!

<<< Top of Page

 Books

Boye De Mente, Atsushi Umeda: The Pocket Tokyo Subway Guide. - 112 p., April 2002, Kodansha Europe, ISBN 4770027788

TOKYO METROPOLITAN AREA RAIL & ROAD ATLAS

This atlas provides place and station names both in English and Japanese with detailed operation maps of all railways in and around Tokyo incl. Yokohama. ISBN 4770017812

Shaw, Dennis: TOKYO SUBWAYS. - Hoikusha, Osaka, 1992.

11x15 cm, soft cover with 135 pages, incl. 33 color and 39 b/w photos English version ISBN 4-586-54045-1, Japanese version ISBN 4-586-50832-9

 

 

Links

TOKYO METRO CORPORATION (official page)

TOEI Subway (Official Page)

Tokyo Metro and TOEI Subway on Wikipedia, with details about all lines

Tokyo Subway Platform

Monorail Society

Jacek Wesolowski has drawn a map showing reciprocal operation (joint service of Japanese Railways and Tokyo Subway)

TOKYU Suburban Railways

SAITAMA Railway (inauguration 28 March 2001)

Tsukuba Express (suburban railway Akihabara - Tsukuba, 58.3 km, 2005)

JR East Train Index (Commuter Railways)

Railway Operators in Japan 4: Central Tokyo by Makoto Aoki (from Japan Railway & Transport Review)

Tokyo Subway Map and Tokyo Area Rail Map at Johomaps.com

Central Tokyo Rail & Subway Map by informa

Photos of all Tokyo Railway Stations

 Reciprocal Operation (JR trains and Private Railways on Subway Lines)

Hokuso-train-on-Asaku Keikyu-train-on-Asakusa Line Keisei-train-on-Asakusa Line Seibu-train-on-Yurakucho Line

Tobu-train-on-Yurakucho Line Tobu-train-on-Hibiya Line JR-203-train on Chiyoda Line

 

TRTA Lines | TOEI Lines | Other Rapid Transit in Tokyo | Monorails around Tokyo | Links

 


2011 © UrbanRail.Net by Robert Schwandl.